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HYPHENATED-IDENTITIES
Spain's demography has changed significantly since the early 1990s during which a new generation of Spaniards has come of age. Once a culturally and ethnically homogeneous country, Spain now has a population that is around 10% foreign-born (while in 1991 only 0.9% was foreign-born). With this change, the concept of Spanish national identity has evolved profoundly. What does it mean now to be "Spanish"?

With "Hyphenated-Identities" I document the case of Chinese adoption in Spain, a phenomenon which emphasizes the fact that Spanish identity must be reconsidered and redefined. China, in 2010, was the number one origin country for Spanish international adoptions.

"Hyphenated-Identities" considers how these adopted Chinese children will identify themselves as they grow older. Raised in Spanish families with little or no contact with their birth country, will they simply consider themselves Spaniards? Or will their ethnic traits and the perception that outsiders have of them cause them to embrace dual heritages—or hyphenated identities—stemming from their birth and adoption?

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